In the process, she got a bit of advice: Eric isn't the guy for her.

dating friend guy-71

It felt terribly uncomfortable choosing possible future friends based on their looks. Communication with me – which had been responsive and timely for 10 days – ceased 30 minutes prior to our organised meet-up.

I felt dismissive and judgmental from the outset, but knew it was part of the game and the only way to progress forward. Nonchalantly sipping my sad glass of wine alone, I knew then he was never to be heard from again.

The initial hours on day one of Tinder friend-making were exciting, confusing, and hectic. Intellectual with glasses, 27, multiple flag emojis (inferring multilingualism)? Irrationally, of course, because neither of us were trying to sleep with the other.

I've sat in the passenger seat of the "swipe left, swipe right" phenomenon with single friends before, but this time I was driving. Our chat had graduated from Tinder to Facebook Messenger, meaning I knew he was legitimate, and the days of preceding conversation lined up with who he was in real life. Tinder Friend Date number two went similarly, and had you asked me at this point how my experiment was going, I would have replied: "Easiest. Ever." That was until I got stood up by Tinder Friend Date number three.

By the night's end, Eric still managed to take home a rose while Rachel was left wondering about his true intentions.

Should she have listened to everything her girls said? I've always valued my close friendships with my female friends, but I've been in the same boat as Rachel.

First came the conversation with my husband: "Are you OK with me doing this? Two or three matches I was dead-keen to meet pretty early on: The conversations flowing, the interests mutual, the humour well-received. There were some unfortunate experiences, too, where the chat turned sour. All of such experiences had me unmatching reasonably swiftly.

" and then the warnings from existing friends: "Seriously, a lot of people on Tinder will think the 'friends' thing is a front for cheating and/or three-ways." I downloaded the app, created my profile using my most recent Facebook pictures, and wrote a short bio with a full disclaimer of what I was on Tinder for. Others petered out quickly because of mundane chat on both sides, though the communication was never as banal as on other dating apps (where "Up to? There were matches who obviously didn't read my bio and persistently asked what my husband and I were "looking for"; and a match that, despite my diplomacy, offended me more than once and caveated it with, "I'm not rude. When it came to my first real life Tinder Friend Date, I felt as nervous as if I were single and dating again.

But theoretically, Jess, Meet Ken is going to be great for everyone: women win, since they’ll be able to “call the shots” and not sift through hundreds and hundreds of off-putting dude-notes, and men also win, since they’re supposedly terrible at writing their own profiles anyway.

It worked for Ken, after all — he met his wife, Jess (obviously), through a female friend who was using a similar site back in 2003.

Here’s how it works: a lady sets up a profile for a gentleman she knows and likes, but doesn’t want to date herself, because he’s her brother or coworker or tall or short or really into Dave Matthews, whatever.