The half-life of a radioactive isotope describes the amount of time that it takes half of the isotope in a sample to decay.

In the case of radiocarbon dating, the half-life of carbon 14 is 5,730 years.

Libby and others (University of Chicago) devised a method of estimating the age of organic material based on the decay rate of carbon-14.

section, i thought i would try here first to see if there was something obvious i missed...well, heres the question: Analysis on an animal bone fossil at an archeological site reveals that the bone has lost between 90%-95% of c-14.

Give an interval for the possible ages of the bone.

see, i told you it didnt give many details, i looked up carbon dating on google and it said the approx.

half life of c years, but i still dont get the question overall, any input is much appreciated!

Radiocarbon dating estimates can be obtained on wood, charcoal, marine and freshwater shells, bone and antler, and peat and organic-bearing sediments.

They can also be obtained from carbonate deposits such as tufa, calcite, marl, dissolved carbon dioxide, and carbonates in ocean, lake and groundwater sources.

Carbon dioxide is distributed on a worldwide basis into various atmospheric, biospheric, and hydrospheric reservoirs on a time scale much shorter than its half-life.

Measurements have shown that in recent history, radiocarbon levels have remained relatively constant in most of the biosphere due to the metabolic processes in living organisms and the relatively rapid turnover of carbonates in surface ocean waters.

At any particular time all living organisms have approximately the same ratio of carbon 12 to carbon 14 in their tissues.